The Worry Fight

Have you fought a few rounds with worry lately? More often than we would like, many of us find ourselves in the ring trying to knock worry out. We fret about things like beauty, money, success, health, family and …. even worry itself! Gradually, worry becomes a fact of life, part of the human condition, or something we expect to come with responsibility.

We stay in the ring, routinely fighting one worry after another, even though we know our efforts are futile. There’s no winning against worry, and we know this. It doesn’t solve anything, but tossing it around in the ring seems to make us feel productive somehow. Then, circumstances change and our current worry opponent becomes weaker. We’re ready to take off our gloves, but then a fresh worry shows up and relieves the old one. So, we stay in the ring, and we keep swinging.

One day a large, unfamiliar worry shows up in the opposite corner. This fight drags on longer than the rest. The punches surprise us. We can’t stay on our feet. Staggering and out of options, we fall against the ropes.

Where do we go from here? Have you been there? I have. I spent a lot of my life in the ring fighting worry, day in and day out. One opponent after another, I stayed on my feet. But, one day the worry was too big and too unknown. It wore me out. I spent some time hanging on those ropes, searching for a way to end the fight with worry.

I read what God had to say about worry. Did you know the Bible tells us ‘not to fear’ hundreds of times? Some sources say 365 times — interestingly, the same number of days in a year. Regardless of the exact number, it is clear God never intended us to fight with worry at all. How did he intend for us to cope?

Humbly Seek God’s Help

 Humble yourselves, therefore, under God’s mighty hand, that he may lift you up in due time. Cast all your anxiety on him because he cares for you. 1 Peter 5:6-7 New International Version (NIV)

In Christianity, humility means to hold a modest opinion of one’s importance and abilities in relation to God. Humbly seeking God’s help requires us to overcome any barriers like pride, shame, or even ignorance which stand in the way of our relationship with him. Admitting we cannot find answers on our own opens the door for God to help. Our prayers start a relationship with him, thus serving him in one of the best possible ways.

As we grow in faith, we realize that no problem is too big or small for God. Everything that happens to us concerns him because he loves us, no matter what. We were not meant to handle our problems without his help. However, if we don’t ask him for help, he certainly lets us try (free will). God does not occasionally want our worries. He does not only want to hear about certain things. God wants every concern; he wants ALL our anxiety.

Trust God’s Care and Plans for You

Trust in the Lord with all your heart; do not depend on your own understanding. Seek his will in all you do, and he will show you which path to take. Proverbs 3: 5-6 New Living Translation (NLT)

When worries weigh heavy on our hearts we try anything to remedy our situation – even more worrying. Urgent situations may cause us to forget to pray or to delay it. We might doubt God’s ability to help us. Or, we might wonder why God would even want to help us. Prayer can become our last resort. Trusting God with “all your heart” means trusting him FIRST, not last.

God wants us to rely on him. We cannot control or fully understand our circumstances, but God does. He has a plan for our lives, and he wants to help us find our way. Prayer provides the time we need to free our conscience and voice concerns. Do our problems magically vanish? No. But, prayer can relieve worry by rejuvenating us with God’s hope and new direction. Scripture brings us reassurance and helps evaluate decisions. We start noticing how love shows up for us in times of trouble, and we may discover how our experiences can help us love others. Trusting God, in good times and in bad, helps us discover paths away from worry. 

Share the Load

Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light. Matthew 11: 28-30 NIV

Many of Jesus’ teachings in the Bible use farming metaphors. Farming was a common activity people could relate to. A yoke is a harness worn by oxen to pull a load behind them and complete work. In this Scripture, Jesus asks us to share the yoke with him, so he can help pull our burdens in life. Our troubles may not be removed, but Christ’s strength makes our load lighter and more manageable.

Sharing the yoke allows us to focus on the work we can do and leave the rest up to God. Worry only distracts us from seeing the ways God is helping. Dwelling on the what if’s stall us from walking forward in faith-filled directions. Those directions might include things like asking others for prayers and support, exploring resources, taking care of our health, seeking professional help, or enjoying God in new ways. Focusing on God’s guidance and results, instead of worry, makes us more productive in our circumstances.  

Find Peace and Rest

I am leaving you with a gift—peace of mind and heart. And the peace I give is a gift the world cannot give. So don’t be troubled or afraid. John 14:27 NLT

As God in human flesh, Jesus knew what suffering lay ahead. Praying in the Garden of Gethsemane on the night before his crucifixion, he was overcome with anguish and deep sorrow regarding the agony ahead (Matthew 26:36-39). Yet, because of his faith in God’s sovereignty and good, he left willingly with the Roman soldiers who came for him.

His pure heart had never felt guilt, anxiety, or fear until he chose to become sin for us. By accepting our sin while on the cross, he endured not only physical torture, but infinitely worse, a spiritual separation from God (Matthew 27:46). Because of his sacrifice, his believers will never experience this kind of separation from God; they receive the gift of eternal life.

As believers, we never have to endure anything as horrific as Jesus did. But like Jesus, we must remind ourselves not to fear because we also trust God is in control and working things for good. Faith allows us to face concerns one day at a time and remain assured God will meet our needs (Matthew 6:25-34). 

Before he died, Jesus told his disciples he would send peace to dwell within his followers through the Holy Spirit. Our faith ignites the Holy Spirit to offer peace, so even in the most difficult circumstances we know we will be okay. The world cannot offer us that kind of lasting peace.

Fighting worry requires us to bring all our best moves, fancy footwork, and endurance. We’re good fighters, but eventually worry wears us out. Crawling to the ropes, we try hoisting ourselves up. Beaten, tired, and struggling, our minds run out of options.

But wait…someone is on the other side of the ropes. Offering a hand, he pulls us clear of the ring. Turn around. Look at worry now. He’s dancing around, throwing jabs in the air, and searching for an opponent. He can keep swinging. We are done. As our friend and rescuer says, “It is finished”.

When you run out of options, you run into Jesus. 

“Don’t be afraid,” he said. “Take courage! I am here!” -Mark 6:50 (NLT) 

Press on in faith my friends.

Dear God,

Thank you for your gentle reminders not to worry. You show love and care for me daily through your blessings, people, and opportunities. Keep my eyes open to the ways you work on my behalf so I do not take any of it for granted. Continue teaching me humility so I bring more worries to you in prayer. When I get caught up trying to fix or control circumstances, help me remember to trust your plans and come to you first not last. Help me focus on what I can do instead of worrying about what I cannot. Lead me in finding the plans you have for me. As I feel and see the way faith lightens my load, I pray my peace will also grow. In Jesus’ Name, Amen

Related Posts:

Learning to Pray

Psalm 23: A Shepherd’s Meanings and Motivations

Embracing God’s Plan

Trusting God Along the Eagle Trail

Three Ways Gratitude Boosts Faith

Where Joy Flows From

For me, the trickiest part of kayaking is just getting in the boat. Stepping off the dock one foot at a time into a rocking, unsteady object is a bit unnerving. Will it lurch suddenly in the wrong direction when my unbalanced weight makes contact? Can my other leg join the effort quickly and precisely enough to thwart disaster? Or, will my typically clumsy nature land me in the lake?

Fortunately, I am blessed with a husband who understands my worries and is familiar with my lack of grace. As I step from the dock to the kayak, he steadies me with his hand and offers lighthearted reassurances that I will not get wet.

Once I am in the boat, my anxious perspective makes a dramatic shift. As I push out from the dock’s wooden planks, I find myself immersed in blue. Blue skies and blue water for as far as my eyes can see. I breathe it in. My body relaxes and my mind becomes calm. Troubles seem removed…distant. I feel like nothing can disturb my peace. I think this must be what joy feels like.

If you’ve been in a kayak, you know balanced paddle strokes keep you moving ahead. Strokes pull through the water front-to-back on one side and then the other in rotation. Staying on course amidst waves requires holding the paddle straight, strong, and steady on the side you want to turn towards.

Much like waves hitting a kayak, we meet challenges in life which rock and impede the course we travel. Often, a mindset of joy is difficult to maintain. Where does joy flow from in the Christian faith? What actions support keeping it?

Seven Steps to Joyful…

1. Mindful 

Be still, and know that I am God! Psalm 46:10 New Living Translation (NLT)

The word mindful means to be attentive and insightful. From a Biblical perspective, being mindful is devoting our attention to God through prayer, Bible study, or reflection. This invites the Holy Spirit to help us let go of trouble and set our minds on peace.

Taking time to avoid distractions wakes us up to the various ways God speaks to us. Our issues become more apparent and decisions get confirmed. We may notice the same message coming at us in different ways and from different sources. Being mindful tunes us into the many ways God works to reach us, reassure us, and help us.

2. Thankful 

Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good; his love endures forever. Psalm 107:1 New International Version (NIV)

Becoming mindful naturally leads us to become more thankful. When we take note of God’s messages of love and guidance around us, we recognize how blessed we are. Soon our habit of thankfulness begins to outweigh our desire to worry and complain. As we appreciate more of what God does for us, our relationship with him becomes closer. We feel encouraged in both trouble and opportunity. Thankfulness leads us to appreciate what we have, teaches us to learn from problems, and helps us discover the ways God is working for our good. 

3. Prayerful

Devote yourselves to prayer with an alert mind and a thankful heart. Colossians 4:2 (NLT)

Powerful prayers begin by relying on our thankful habits. Praising God for his love and forgiveness helps us frame our requests to him.

God is not picky about where or how we pray. He simply wants to hear about our challenges and the requests we have for ourselves and others. The load we carry becomes lighter when we tell him our fears, confess our sins, and ask for his help. Spending time in prayer eases our burdens and brings clarity to the dreams God has placed in our hearts.  

4. Truth Full

You will seek me and find me when you seek me with all your heart. Jeremiah 29:13 (NIV)

Along with prayer, a knowledge of God’s promises or truths found in the Bible brings us closer to him. Seeking him means discovering who he is and what he wants for us. Spending time learning about God’s love and wisdom fills us with his truth. It makes us truth full. Scripture teaches us about hope, strength, and how to live our lives. When we feel lost, the Bible provides a place to go for help and direction. Becoming full of God’s truth builds confidence in faith and leads us to carry out his plans.

5. Dutiful

 Then he said to the crowd, “If any of you wants to be my follower, you must give up your own way, take up your cross daily, and follow me.” Luke 9:23 (NLT)

Dutiful means conscientiously or obediently fulfilling one’s duty. Becoming mindful, thankful, prayerful, and truth full helps us work on understanding the actions God wants us to take to live joyfully. Sometimes obedience to God feels uncomfortable and goes against the ways of this world. Being a disciple often requires denial of self-centered desires in order to serve God’s purposes. Dutiful followers willingly make sacrifices and take action to bring glory to God’s name instead of their own. 

6. Peaceful 

You will keep in perfect peace all who trust in you, all whose thoughts are fixed on you! Isaiah 26:3 (NLT)

Peace comes from a deep knowing that we have done all we can to follow God’s instructions. Continually looping back to being mindful, thankful, prayerful, truth full, and dutiful helps us reach the point of peace. As a fruit of the Holy Spirit, the calm stability of peace can be delivered even in times of chaos. Although life will not always go the way we would like, our work through these steps teaches us to rely on God’s help. Peace requires letting go of control and trusting God’s love to work for our good.

7. Joyful

Though you have not seen him, you love him; and even though you do not see him now, you believe in him and are filled with an inexpressible and glorious joy, 1 Peter 1:8

Biblically speaking, our joy does not depend on whether things are going well or not. Many consider happiness and joy to mean the same thing. Biblical scholars, however, distinguish between the two in relation to Christian life. Happiness is defined as a feeling that is dependent on circumstances, and it is fleeting in nature. Joy, however, like peace, is a gift from the Holy Spirit. It can remain regardless of trouble, and it may even increase.

Once we find peace within ourselves, it becomes easier to observe and not get immersed in the swells of emotion that enter our lives. We still feel sadness, fear and other difficult emotions, but they don’t overtake us. With practice, our focus on God heightens our sense of well-being. We feel more even keel in the midst of trials. A calm satisfaction flows from the peace of trusting God with our circumstances – this is joy.

Experiencing joy through faith is a process. One that takes consistent time, preparation, and courage. Taking steps to become mindful, thankful, prayerful, truth full, dutiful, and peaceful teaches us about our God who loves us and is always with us. When waves come and rock our boat, we practice using these steps to get better at keeping our peace – maintaining a straight, strong, and steady course. We discover joy in the midst of it all.

Ready to do some work for joy? Step off the dock into the boat. Push off strong. Paddle left, paddle right. Keep paddling. Look ahead. I see blue. Do you?

Prayer for the Week:

Dear God,

Thank you for giving me the tools I need to steady myself in this world and discover your joy. Help me grow more mindful of your presence and blessings that fill my life each day. Draw closer to me as I develop an attitude of thankfulness for those blessings, and as I look for your good in anything that comes my way. Guide me as I work on taking my life to you in prayer. Fill me with your truths and teach me how to dutifully apply them. Bring peace to my heart as I surrender control and trust in your care. May the joy from your Holy Spirit flow through me always. In Jesus’ Name, Amen

Other Resources:

For more on peace, read Seeking 3 Kinds of Peace

For more on other gifts from the Holy Spirit, read Making Pie with the Holy Spirit

For more on thankfulness, read Three Ways Gratitude Boosts Faith

Note Photo Credit: Photos 1, 2, and 5 in this blog are from Pixabay.com. The rest are my own.

Living in God’s Light

People generally see what they look for, and hear what they listen for. -Harper Lee

When you set out to purposely find something, it’s interesting how apparent it becomes. I am looking for light. All sorts of light, really. It is a suggested Christmas activity in a book I am reading.

Of course, this time of year we see Christmas lights on trees, in neighborhoods and in shopping malls. There is sunlight, fluorescent light, and screen light from our many electronic devices.

There are lights that don’t physically glow, but instead brighten our spirits. They shine, for example, when other hurried shoppers make conversation with us or when we enjoy the outdoors. We feel them when we meet a friend for lunch, hear of a good deed, or spend time with family.

The word “enlightenment” itself contains “light”. Gaining insight from Scripture, meditating, or praying for understanding brings this light.

In the New International Version of the Bible, the word “light” appears 232 times, and closer to 300 times in other versions. Clearly, light reigns as an important theme in faith. What does “light” mean in the Bible, and how does it apply to us?

What does light mean in the Bible?

Light’s significance in the Bible starts immediately in Genesis 1, with the story of God creating the earth.

Then God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light. And God saw that the light was good. Then he separated the light from the darkness. God called the light “day” and the darkness “night.” And evening passed and morning came, marking the first day. Genesis 1:3 New Living Translation (NLT)

On the very first day, God set out to separate light from dark. Then, throughout the Bible, light continually refers to God and to the removal of darkness. It becomes a metaphor for many things including life, love, goodness, truth, and salvation. In the stories told, God’s goodness is always sovereign over evil. In no instance is darkness ever equal to the light that is God’s power.

The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness can never extinguish it. John 1:5 NLT

Unquestionably for the Christian faith, God’s greatest work of light is Jesus. As the Son of God, his life models the way to live in God’s light.

The one who is the true light, who gives light to everyone, was coming into the world. John 1:9

Light in the Bible is synonymous to God and all of his good. Proclaiming faith in God’s light illuminates the darkness in our lives and works to extinguish it. 

What does darkness mean? How can we find our way out of it? 

When we think of darkness, we think of death and sinful, evil, or awful things. But, darkness may also exist due to a lack of knowledge, unintentional circumstances, or choices made. And, sometimes busyness, distractions, and self-centeredness can lead to us dark places as well. Life is good at dishing out darkness and we often find ourselves lost.

But, every day Jesus offers us a new opportunity, with no expiration date, to see and live in his light.

When Jesus spoke again to the people, he said, “I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will never walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.” John 8:12

Taking steps to follow the life Jesus modeled helps us start seeing more light around us. We become more mindful and recognize when life is becoming muddled. We get better at noticing the slick spots around us and find surer footing to meet our goals. Bettering ourselves and serving others gradually become higher priorities.

Packed with Jesus’ words and teachings, the Bible lights the way as we walk through life. It reveals the things in this world that trip us up, and it shines light on every situation we come across.

Your word is a lamp to guide my feet and a light for my path. Psalm 119:105 NLT

We can find our way through darkness by following the life Jesus modeled for us. By learning about him and believing in him, we experience his guidance through the Holy Spirit. 

Living in God’s Light

“Look! The virgin will conceive a child! She will give birth to a son, and they will call him Immanuel, which means ‘God is with us.'” Matthew 1:23 NLT 

This week we celebrate Jesus’ birth, an event which divided darkness from light in this world. His life delivered light and hope; his death and resurrection wiped away darkness by offering believers eternal life.

For God, who said, “Let there be light in the darkness,” has made this light shine in our hearts so we could know the glory of God that is seen in the face of Jesus Christ. 2 Corinthians 4:6 NLT

Jesus, Immanuel, is God with us. He shines through us by way of the Holy Spirit as we mature in faith and reflect Christ’s nature. We are works in progress while we are here. Through faith we can work to understand how God’s plans help us contribute to his light. We live in light through fellowship with God and with others who help us find goodness in a world that is often dark. 

Christmas is more than festivities and time spent with family. It is more than understanding the story of Jesus’ birth. Christmas celebrates light – the light of Jesus, and the light of you and me. There is a lot of light in this world. It is found all around us and inside of us. We can see it. People generally see what they go looking for…

A Prayer for Your Week:

Dear God,

Thank you for another Christmas to celebrate the birth of your son, Jesus, who brought light into our world through his life, his teachings, and ultimately his sacrifice. Teach us and guide us as we strive to model his character more each day. Help us to clearly see the opportunities you place in our paths to do your work, and to recognize the work of others. We pray to see your goodness shining bright in the midst of the darkness this world so often delivers. In Jesus’ Name, Amen

Resources:

Turning Christmas Upside Down

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Our Thanksgiving leftovers were still warm when my husband and I started pulling out the Christmas decorations last weekend. With only four amazingly short weeks between holidays, I am sure many of you can relate to our anxious excitement to get a jump-start on the to-do list. After an initial whirlwind of decorating the tree, setting up the manger, and hanging the stockings, I took a break and went for a walk.

There is a certain loop I follow on most of my walks. It winds through the woods, past a pond, into a neighborhood, and back again. Because I am a creature of habit, I usually walk the same direction on this route each time. On this particular day, I decided to live life a little more on the edge and traveled the opposite way. Daring, I know!

Have you noticed how doing things backwards or turning things upside down often brings a different perspective and teaches you something new? This walk was no exception. I came back with a fresh outlook about my walking route and about preparing for Christmas. I was ready to turn Christmas upside down.

What does turning Christmas upside down mean?

The usual preparations for Christmas include decorating, shopping, baking, wrapping, entertaining, mailing holiday greetings, etc. – done in an “orderly” fashion for each household, of course 😉 . When Christmas Eve arrives, many celebrate Jesus by going to church for an hour or so. Some will read the Bible story of Jesus’ birth. In comparison to everything else done in December, little time is dedicated to learning about Jesus until Christmas actually arrives.

Turning Christmas upside down means celebrating and learning about Jesus throughout the month instead of at the end of the month.  

How can we benefit by turning Christmas upside down?

  • We learn new things about Jesus.

Traveling the opposite way on my walk brought a changed perspective on my surroundings. For example, from a different vantage point I realized the huge, beautiful weeping willow tree I pass almost every day was no longer there – only a stump remained. I wondered if it had been gone a long time, and how I missed noticing the emptiness.

In a similar way, turning Christmas upside down helps us see things about Jesus we did not notice before. Reading Bible passages about his birth throughout the month brings ideas to mind that we are unable to take in all at once on Christmas Eve.  Enjoying a new book about the meaning of Christmas or participating in an online Bible study provides learning and a break from holiday activity. Working on a Christmas service project lessens distractions by helping us focus on others. Or, simply carving out some time for prayer can bring us closer to knowing Jesus. All these things send us a different way than the norm.

Activities that help us see Jesus throughout the month deliver knowledge we did not even know we were missing.

  •  We become more aware of Jesus in everyday life.

I’ll fess up. Coming at the scenery of my walk in a different direction made me feel a little out of my element. Because the walk was not done in my natural pattern, I worried that I might miss the normal turns in the neighborhood. As a result, my brain jerked to attention and I became more aware of my surroundings.

Turning Christmas upside down also makes us feel uneasy. There are a million things to do besides focusing on Jesus, right? It feels more natural to get on with the shopping and the wrapping and the planning. But, if we change our route to include Jesus in each day, we begin to notice his love more during the month. We pay attention when our circumstances improve or we learn from them. We smile more and tell people we appreciate them. We thank our loved ones and really mean it. We notice how God is working for our good every day.

Heightening our awareness of Jesus naturally makes us more alert to his goodness in everything we do. 

  • We slow down and enjoy our holiday time.

Learning new things and becoming more aware on my walk caused me to slow down and enjoy myself more. While walking in the opposite direction, I was not lost in thought or on exercise autopilot. My environment captured my attention, and I found myself feeling grateful for that.

If the same logic applies, then learning new things about Jesus and becoming more aware of him in the midst of our preparations will also help us slow down and enjoy our holiday time more.

Taking time to learn and look for Jesus as we walk (don’t run) towards Christmas brings us more gratitude and peace.

So, I am almost finished with my decorating. Yesterday, I placed a snow globe on the table in the entry way. I love snow globes and the miniature magical lands inside them. Everything appears so pristine, orderly, and still while they sit right side up.

Looking at mine like this, I think it’s pretty, but hmm… also kind of boring. The real magic happens when we turn it upside down and shake things around a bit. I turn the globe upside down. There…that makes it more beautiful, more interesting.

I watch the snow swirl, and I smile. A lot of things in life look better after you turn them upside down.

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A Prayer for Your December:

Don’t copy the behavior and customs of this world, but let God transform you into a new person by changing the way you think. Then you will learn to know God’s will for you, which is good and pleasing and perfect. Romans 12:2 NLT

Dear God,

Blessed be your name above all the other things competing for our attention this holiday season. Thank you for the precious gift of your son, sent to offer us eternal life with you. Help us walk in a different direction towards Christmas this year. Bring us new opportunities to learn about Jesus and show us how we can serve you. Open our eyes to your joy in all the preparations we undertake. May we enjoy our walk with you this month, and be filled with the peace and gratitude that comes from spending time in your presence. In Jesus’ Name, Amen

 

Resources to Help Turn your Christmas Upside Down

Online Bible Study based on the book Because of Bethlehem by Max Lucado 

Scripture readings about Jesus’ birth

The Purpose of Christmas by Rick Warren on Amazon.com

A Scriptured Life posts from the 2015 Christmas season:

Christmas Countdown Challenge Week 1 -Worry

Christmas Countdown Challenge Week 2 -Expectations

Christmas Countdown Challenge Week 3 -Peace

Christmas Countdown Challenge Week 4 -Celebration

Trusting God along the Eagle Trail: Isaiah 40:31

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“How hard could it be?” my husband and I joked, downplaying the warning of hiking difficulty at the head of the Eagle Trail. We were morning fresh, caffeinated, and ready to explore the beauty of Door County, Wisconsin.

A park ranger had suggested a half mile loop, starting high on a hill and winding along the scenic Green Bay shoreline. We started down a set of perfectly laid stone steps, expressing our approval for the gradual descent and nicely paved path.

Just a few side notes worth mentioning here before we continue. One, never mock a difficult trail sign. Two, no matter what amount of distance you estimate hiking, an empty hand should always carry a water bottle. And, three, for me, if an eagle is involved there is usually a reason. 

It did not take long for us to realize that those easy, well-kept steps were simply a deceiving welcome mat of sorts. After our descent, we crossed a threshold. Our man-made steps ended and we entered a home in disarray – a beautiful mess of a home called the forest. As the new definition of “difficult trail” dawned on us, a favorite Scripture verse replayed in my mind. I smiled, knowing God had just opened up his classroom door for us.

But those who trust in the Lord will find new strength. They will soar high on wings like eagles. They will run and not grow weary. They will walk and not faint. Isaiah 40:31 New Living Translation (NLT)

But those who trust in the Lord will find new strength.

Life is a lot like this Eagle Trail, I think, as I gingerly maneuver through piles of moss-covered rocks, climb over fallen trees, and stumble over a network of roots. Like this trail, life presents an obstacle course, and we have to figure out how to maneuver through it.

We naturally lean towards cutting our own path because we think we can control the outcome that way. But, a lot of the time we end up more lost, tired, and confused. Often, it is then, at the end of our own resources, we look up and see God’s signage marking a trail.

Trusting God to supply new strength requires studying his Word, conversing with him through prayer, and patiently watching for his direction. We cannot expect results overnight; sincere relationships take time, practice, and awareness. God waits. He waits for us to make the choice to diligently seek him, and when we do, he provides us with new strength to follow his lead on life’s difficult trails.

In the Bible, the eagle often symbolizes God’s renewal of strength. It is uncertain how many distinct species of eagles there were in Biblical times, but at least four types exist in Israel today.* Eagles, in general, are some of the largest and most powerful birds of prey. Eagles are also unique from other birds in that they molt or shed their feathers in old age, thus appearing to renew their youth. In Biblical times, the commonality of eagles, coupled with their notable characteristics most likely yielded the comparison of God’s strength to the eagle.

They will soar high on wings like eagles.

Following the trail toward the water, I imagine what it would be like to soar like an eagle. Certainly, God would love for us to feel that free. Trusting God with our worries and fears, allows us to soar above trouble and freely discover the purposes he has planned for us. 

The eagle uses a lot of energy when it flaps its long wings, so catching wind currents and gliding are very important for conserving strength. Eagles patiently wait for warm updrafts of air before lift off. Using their powerful wings, they climb 10,000 to 15,000 feet high then soar for hours with minimal effort. The eagle trusts the wind to carry him; this Scripture reminds us to trust God to carry us. 

Eaglets learn to fly by hopping around in their nest and then taking short flights to neighboring branches. Some eagle parents force their babies to fly by messing up the nest until they tumble out. Opinions vary on whether the eagle parent sometimes swoops below and catches the fluttering eaglet on the platform of their long wings. Whether or not this happens, the eaglet continues returning to the nest to try again until it learns to soar. The nests of our lives certainly get messed up sometimes. Maybe God allows this so he can teach us how to fly as well?

 

They will run and not grow weary. They will walk and not faint.

Reaching the rocky shoreline, we marvel for a moment at the strength of the waves and listen to them crash mightily at our feet. Our best guess tells us we have accidentally strayed at least a mile past the park ranger’s half mile loop suggestion. Our morning freshness and caffeine have worn off. We wonder if we will come across a porta potty in this forest.

Continuing on, we occasionally meet other humans navigating their way on the trail. To my chagrin, most carry water bottles and walking sticks. “Did you come from the parking lot?” we feebly ask. “How long did it take you to get to this point?” “Does the path get any easier?” Looking at the cliffs above, we expect a steep climb up to the parking lot. What seemed like a hill starting out now appears to be a mountain!

We laugh at ourselves, and with the other hikers at our predicament. We know we will eventually reach our destination, find a bathroom, and drive to town for a slice of Door County’s famous cherry pie. There are times in life, however, when the length and the outcome of suffering is not so certain.

There are times when the only thing we can do is pray hard for strength to continue through each day. Strength to run and not grow weary. Courage to walk and not be faint. When we experience difficult days, we pray God will send us a trail sign or hope to cling to. On this Eagle Trail, I think about how in my life, when I needed strength and reassurance, God sent me to the Scripture verse Isaiah 40:31.

I love birds, especially eagles, so maybe that is why this Scripture captured my attention when my daughter became very sick with Crohn’s disease. Repeating it in my mind when I felt at a loss for how to help her pulled me through some tough days. Once, after visiting her at college and having to leave her there seriously ill, I merged onto the interstate and my eyes flooded with tears. I repeated Isaiah 40:31 under my breath, then happened to look up and see an eagle flying overhead. My tears stopped as my mind worked on comprehending this. I felt reassured that I could handle the drive home and whatever else I needed to do that day.

Eagles continued making appearances in my life during the worst of my daughter’s illness and since then. Last spring we moved into a town home with a walking trail behind it. One of the first evenings my husband and I went for a walk, a new neighbor pointed out an eagle’s nest high in a tree behind our house. “Be sure to watch for them,” he said. “Their babies will be hatching soon.” Coincidence or God’s reassurance for me?

The way I see it, a relationship with God helps lift us above this obstacle course we face on earth. He helps us learn to soar without worry. He is the wind that carries us so we do not tire. He asks us to trust his keen eyesight which sees miles ahead, foreseeing danger and assuring our good. If we have faith, we will always be strong enough to find our way along the Eagle Trail.

 

P.S. The day after our hike on the Eagle Trail, we received a troubling phone call from someone in need of our help. I was on the phone as we drove down an empty stretch of winding Wisconsin highway. My husband tapped my leg and pointed to the sky. An eagle, wings stretched out strong and wide, drew soaring circles in our sky. 

A Prayer for Your Week:

Dear God,

Thank you for your reassurances when life gets hard and messy. Your Word speaks to my heart and brings me strength to continue. Help me to remember that you see what is ahead, and that your plans always work for my good. Plant your hope firmly in my heart and lift me up when I am tired. Show me how to soar above concern and find joy through knowing it is all under your control. In Jesus’ Name, Amen

A Few Other Scriptures Referencing Eagles

  • “He fills my life with good things. My youth is renewed like the eagle’s!” Psalm 103:5 New Living Translation (NLT)
  • “..like an eagle that stirs up its nest and hovers over its young, that spreads its wings to catch them and carries them aloft.” Deuteronomy 32:11 New International Version (NIV)
  • “You have seen what I did to the Egyptians. You know how I carried you on eagles’ wings and brought you to myself.” Exodus 19:4 NLT
  • “How beloved and gracious were Saul and Jonathan! They were together in life and in death. They were swifter than eagles, stronger than lions.” 2 Samuel 1:23 NLT
  • “Does the eagle soar at your command and build its nest on high? It dwells on a cliff and stays there at night; a rocky crag is its stronghold. From there it looks for food; its eyes detect it from afar.” Job 39:27-29 NIV

Inspiring Eagle Resources 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service eagle facts here 

Bald eagle frequently asked questions and answers here

Are eaglets really carried on their parents’ wings when learning to fly? Some say yes, some say no. More here

Commentaries on the Bible verse Isaiah 40:31 here

*Species of Eagles in the Bible here

Related Posts on Trusting God for Strength:

Prayer Walking in the Wilderness

Where is God when Life Hurts

Learning to Pray

Riding on God’s Back